Q. So why are mono-unsaturated fats good for us?

Q. Is cholesterol still considered important?

Q. Why are Macadamias good value?

Q. What are some other uses for Macadamias?

Q. What are "seconds"?

 

So why are mono-unsaturated fats good for us?

A recent study at Wesley Hospital in Brisbane found that a diet enriched by macadamias actually lowers harmful blood cholesterol in participating patients. The research concluded that eating 6-20 macadamia nuts per day actually lowered harmful blood cholesterol by 7% and triglycerides by 25% when compared with a high complex carbohydrate diet.

Is cholesterol still considered important?

The discussions and information about cholesterol in the last 10 years have been controversial. However, an increased blood cholesterol level is still considered one of the major risk factors in the development of cardiovascular disease. It is recognised that one of the dietary factors contributing most to an increased blood cholesterol level is the type of dietary fat consumed. A high intake of saturated fat (typical Western diet) contributes to increased blood cholesterol while a higher proportion of monounsaturated and poly-unsaturated fats (such as in Macadamias) appears to protect against cardiovascular disease by lowering total cholesterol and increasing the HDL-cholesterol (good cholesterol).

Why are Macadamias good value?

Eating the best tasting products that are best for you is always good value! To look at it another way, if we pick 100 kg of nuts with husk from our trees we will have 46 kg after dehusking, 34.5 kg after drying and only 10 kg of kernel after cracking. Thus we have 90% waste products - the remaining 10% deserves to be good!

Other uses for Macadamias

  • Sexual Tonics - perhaps the most unique use reported for macadamia nuts in in the treatment of sexual phobias.
  • Mulch - macadamia husks are generally returned to the field as mulch or used for compost material.
  • Potting Mix & Fuel - shells are sometimes used by flower growers for growing media, but their best use is as fuel.

SECONDS - This term refers to kernel which has been insect damaged or marked by basal stain.  The stain can be in green or brown tones and is presumed to be caused by tannin from the shell.  It often means the nut might be sweeter and is generally found in 'stick-tight' nuts that need to be picked off the tree by hand.  Here is a 3kg bag of typical SECONDS.